Carter Sande

carter.sande@duodecima.technology @__cartr__ | gitlab.com/cartr

Co-author of Hello World! 2nd Edition

Things I've made


ChartFudge for iOS

Don’t get caught up in drudgery, engage in chart-fudgery! ChartFudge is now available as a native iOS app!

Originally posted on itunes.apple.com

I made a little website where you can guess which text generation method was used to write Harry Potter fan fiction: carter.sande.duodecima.technology/generation-met…

Originally posted on twitter.com

So my @Koding #hackathon app didn't make it into the top 100. Oh well, I still had lots of fun making it!

Originally posted on twitter.com

My @koding #hackathon project lets you make convincing fake line charts

Originally posted on twitter.com

Spotted a little Comic Sans at the fanciest hotel in Canada

Originally posted on twitter.com

I converted the pixel fonts from #Undertale so you can use them on your website or PC: cartr.gitlab.io/undertale-font…

Originally posted on twitter.com

The publishers of the German edition of the book put an amazingly accurate copy of my 2011 blog design on the CD:

Originally posted on twitter.com

My new favorite Python module: run CSS-like queries on HTML documents in Python. Perfect for web scraping! pythonhosted.org/pyquery/

Originally posted on twitter.com

How can I display the push notification user permission dialog only when it is needed?

I have implemented registering push notification in my AppDelegate file. As soon as my app launches, it will popup a dialog immediately asking the user to allow permission.

Problem is, user may not understand why it is needed at this time. In order to prevent the user from selecting “Don’t Allow”, I want to show this popup later in a specific ViewController and possibly explain why this is needed to the user.

Is there a way to do so?

The reason the dialog appears immediately is because you’re telling it to appear immediately!

To avoid having the dialog displayed as soon as the app is launched, take your call to registerUserNotificationSettings: and put it somewhere where it isn’t called the first time the app launches.

Originally posted on stackoverflow.com

Fun fact: writing a UTF-8-encoded U+FEFF character at the start of a CSV file is the only way to convince Excel to read the file as UTF-8.

Originally posted on twitter.com

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